My Time at Engine Works by Glen Stuart

My Time at Engine Works - $15.00

My Time at Engine Works

by Glen Stuart

 
PMH&PS, A4 soft cover, $15.00
 
The Commonwealth Government Marine Engine Works built on Port Melbourne foreshore during World War II. In My Time at Engine Works, Glen Stuart details the making of marine engines during his 29-year career at the works.
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Comments

  1. Interested in Doxford Engines

    • David Thompson says:

      Hi Alfons,

      We’ve had a bit of a mixup with our emails here so our reply may not have got through to you yet. A full list of all the Doxford engines built at the works is included in this history on the last two pages of the book. Engine Works at Port Melbourne was the only plant in Australia to have a licence to build these engines. In all, 16 Doxford were built.

      You can purchase the book online using Paypal and selecting Rest of World as the shipping option and we’ll get it to you ASAP.

      Regards,
      David

  2. Andrew Scott says:

    Hello. My father worked at the CMEW in Port Melbourne in the 70,s
    His name was Peter James Scott. Sadly he passed away aged 62 ten years ago this year. He died of mesothelioma. I just wondered if you may have known my father or anyone following this site.
    As his son aged around 8 or 9 at the time, I recall the Xmas functions where the families cam e along and the kids all got a present.
    I know he had friends like Mick Grubb, Michael Mallett , Bobby Brown.
    I do remember going inside this massive warehouse and seeing the size of these engines.

    • David Thompson says:

      Thanks for information regarding your father and his time at Engine Works. I’ve spoken to the author Glen Stuart and in the 1970s, Glen was working in the separate Administration building. He recalls the “open nights” when the public could attend the test runs of the massive engines and as Secretary of the Social Club he did a lot behind the scenes to help organise the christmas functions.

    • Dennis Crowley says:

      Hi Andrew
      I worked with Peter, he was a tradesman and I was an apprentice. I used to love his deep barreled laugh and the pipe hanging from the side of his mouth. He and I both became Tech School teachers.
      Good memories

  3. I was an apprentice at Peacock an Smith in Flinders Street Melbourne between Jan 1977 and Jan 1980 before going to sea and remember the Government Engine Works in Port Melbourne well.

    Yours sincerly John Toms.

    • Janet Bolitho says:

      Thanks Tom, haven’t heard of Peacock and Smith before. What work did you do there? Did you ever visit Engine Works?

      • Ian harris says:

        Hello Janet, we have met at princes pier a few times.
        Peacock and Smith were melb ship repairers with workshops in Flinders St and at Kensington. The politician Andrew Peacock’s family business. They were members of the Aust Ship Repairers Group ,as was my family’s business , V F Harris pty ltd .
        I served my apprenticeship at the Engine Works 1959-1964 before going to sea as a marine engineer . I returned from the sea in 1966 to take over the Business because of the early death of my wonderful Dad, Victor Frank Harris (52), due to asbestos exposure during WW2.
        I am now retired aged 74 ,living in beach st p melb about 200 metres from the old CGEW. Warm regs Ian Victor Harris.

  4. Paul Leslie says:

    Haven’t read the book but very interested to know what is NOT in the book. Started my apprenticeship in ’69 – what a bunch of reprobates! Greatest time of my life. A great learning place. Everyone wanted to teach you something – including older apprentices but that cant be written here!
    I can still scrape a whitemetal bearing and still have all the tools were made ourselves under supervision of magnificent tradesmen.

    • David Thompson says:

      Thanks for dropping by Paul. I’m sure there are stories from workplaces all over Port Melbourne that can’t be written here.

    • Dennis Crowley says:

      Hello Paul
      I just heard about this book today whilst talking to Russel Elbers. Apparently ther is going to be reunion on the 9th July at Port Melbourne

      • christopher towers says:

        Dennis Crowley – I am also ex CGEW, still in the business (i.e. at sea). I do remember you, but was junior to you. How do I get in touch with Russel Elbers??

        • David Thompson says:

          Hi Chris & Dennis,
          It is great that interest in Glen’s book is reconnecting a lot of CGEW people however I would suggest that it is not a good etiquette to put personal contact details on a public forum such as this especially without that person’s permission.

          Chris, we can pass your contact details onto Dennis if you want and ask the question for you.

          Or Dennis, you can pass Russell’s details to us, with his permission, and we can pass it on to Chris.

          Our email is pmhps@pmhps.org.au.

          We just want to respect everyone’s privacy and keep it safe.

          Regards,
          David Thompson
          Volunteer, Port Melbourne Historical and Preservation Society

  5. Laura Fiori says:

    To whom it may concern. My father Renato Libardi and his friend Marino Jachin also worked at CGMEW. I have a photo taken on the 1st December 1966 of the engine with all the workers surrounding it. I can email it if someone contacts me.

    • David Thompson says:

      Thanks Laura,
      It sounds very much like a photo that is in Glen’s book. We’ll contact you by email. It’s certainly worth checking to see if they are the same photo.

    • Ian harris says:

      Dear Laura, i worked with Merino and Renato ,learned lots of skills and lots of fun with naughty Italian. Many great memories, warm regards Ian Harris apprentice at CGEWfrom 1959 to 1964

  6. Lee Fletcher says:

    Ditto with Paul Leslie.
    I was in the same year with Paul.
    When asked by people where I did my apprenticeship, not many people had heard of the Marine Engine Works.
    When explained what we created, built, repaired and the machine we operated they are amazed and disappointed they did not have the opportunity to see our work place.
    Beside that out of all the years in the industry there has never been a better bunch of work mates that you could ever work with.

  7. Paul Chick says:

    Someone said that one could write a book about the characters that worked at this establishment. It was a league of nations, and an eye opener for me as “new Australians” were a rarity in the Sandringham district where I lived, and attended school. Some were magnificent tradesmen, and willing to pass on their skills to apprentices. I worked with Glen at CGEW, and his brother Geoff at the Eastern Treatment Plant Carrum.

  8. Gavin O'Connor says:

    To Andrew Scott. Send me an E-Mail address I think I’ve got a couple of photos of Peter in the London Family pub in Pt Melb. circa 1974. I can pass them on to you if you’re interested. (beezabill7@gmail.com)

  9. IAN JOHNSON says:

    I served my apprenticeship at the CGEW,before going to sea.As mentioned it was the greatest bunch of reprobates and ratbags ever – but the work we turned out was THE BEST. I saw Doxfords, those bloody Napier Deltics, and the first of the Sulzers run, and the engineer from Winterthur said he had not seen better when asked about the quality of the work in the engine. I saw foreign built engines run, and you had to be careful where and what you grabbed when the sea was a bit rough as plate had been oxycut and painted over, even engine parts.
    It was a wonderful place to work, you learned so many different skills, and in later years the name CGEW just opened doors of opportunity too

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