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Town Hall, 333 Bay Street, Port Melbourne
Town Hall, 333 Bay Street, Port Melbourne

Station Pier Welcomes Liners

Crowds welcome the Empress of Britain Imagine an MCG Grand Final crowd thronging around Station Pier. That is what occurred 6 April 1938 when one of the Golden Age of ocean liners, the Empress of Britain, berthed there. This crowd estimate was published in The Argus the following day. At 42,500 tons (43,181 tonnes), it was the biggest vessel ever to…

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Port’s eye sees inside ‘the silent ANZAC’

Port Melbourne played a part in allowing scientists and historians to film inside “the silent ANZAC”* - the historic submarine wreck HMAS AE2. Discovered in 1998, the submarine was scuttled during the Gallipoli campaign. The hulk sits on the bottom of the Sea of Marmara. AE2 Australian War Memorial Researchers from the Defence Science and Technology Organisation, in Lorimer Street, Port Melbourne, developed…

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Finding J Budd

The Ship Inn in Bay St (3) where J Budd and others were farewelled . Port Phillip City Collection The Port Melbourne Standard of 19 September 1914 carried a story about a send-off for three Port lads who had enlisted for the war. On Friday 11 September 1914 about 150 friends and workmates assembled at the Ship Hotel in Bay Street to bid…

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McCormack Street

Member Dr Robyn Clinch explored the history of  26 McCormack St and learned about its very close connection with the Cricketers Arms Hotel. McCormack St is a short, angled street that runs between Esplanade East and Bridge St. McCormack St is so narrow, making it difficult to get a good picture Thomas McCormack began accumulating property in the Sandridge area from his…

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Keeping Warm in Port

South Melbourne Gasworks It is one of Port’s often told stories - how people ‘knocked off’ coal from the trucks taking coal to the Gasworks from Town Pier at the end of Bay Street. Emily Lock remembered "The different cargoes were a source of wonder. Some of them brought coal for the Gasworks. It was a dirty job unloading the coal into small…

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Unhappy Ending

Roland Thomas Rose c1925 Roland Thomas Rose, Licensed Grocer of 168 Ross Street, Port Melbourne, the proud owner of his 'company' car. In the mid 1930's, some ten years after this photograph was taken, Roland was tragically killed in a car accident on the corner of Ross and Graham Streets. The small boy standing on the running board is his son, Frank William (Bill), who was…

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Lost Shops of Graham Street

Shirley Videion recalls the shops in Graham Street before the construction of the Graham Street overpass: Graham Street was blessed with milk bars. The two most preferred by our group when walking on a Sunday were McCarthy's next to the double storey house on the corner of Graham Street and Evans Street or McKenzie's on the other side of the Graham Station…

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Movement at the Station (Pier)

From the PMHPS collection A place of “Welcome and Farewell”  - Early settlers, cargo ships, soldiers going overseas to fight in the wars, new migrants and travellers embarking on an overseas holiday would throw coloured streamers to family, friends and departing soldiers on the pier. streamers sold at the Eastern kiosk, Station Pier Station Pier was originally Railway Pier, built in 1854…

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A Kerosene Ship in Flames

The Hilaria, a 1,500 ton ship from New York caught fire at Town Pier on the morning of the 7th July 1895. Earlier it had been ordered to an outer anchorage away from the pier as its manifest included a case of detonators as well as the usual general cargo including kerosene, rosin and other flammable materials.  The Captain had no knowledge of…

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PMHPS acknowledges the generous support of the City of Port Phillip.

 

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Acknowledgement of Traditional Custodians

We respectfully acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we meet and work, the Bunurong Boon Wurrung and Wurundjeri Woi Wurrung peoples of the Eastern Kulin Nation and pay respect to their Elders past, present and emerging.