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Town Hall, 333 Bay Street, Port Melbourne
Town Hall, 333 Bay Street, Port Melbourne

On the Beach

For these hot days, a summer photo. This is a favourite picture from the PMH&PS collection.  While charming in itself, there is much to be gleaned from the background. It is taken approximately where the Life Saving Headquarters at Sandridge is today. You can see a house in the immediate background with Princes Pier and the chimney of the Starch Factory…

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All England Eleven Hotel

All posts on this site must pass the Port Melbourne connection test. PMHPS suggests that it is not straining this test to say that Port Melbourne has a connection with the history of the Ashes. Read on. Over Christmas 1861, the colony of Victoria was in a fever of anticipation for the arrival of the All England Eleven - the…

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Cottage on the corner

PMHPS has observed a notice of application for a planning permit for this house on the corner of Nott and Farrell Sts, Port Melbourne. Morley's Cottage: cnr Nott and Farrell Streets This is where William Morley lived. Morley was the the first chairman of Sandridge when it became a municipality in 1860. He was Mayor in 1867 and remained a Councillor until…

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Beginning and ending: Holden

Today, after weeks of uncertainty but with an increasing sense of foreboding, Holden announced that it will cease to make cars in Australia from 2017. Holden, Port Melbourne, Fishermans Bend - inseparable. This is where Australia began its journey into automobile manufacture and where it will end. There will be much more said, but PMHPS wanted to mark this sad…

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More Tales from the Bend

showing the location of the abattoir Whenever PMHPS speaks with people who grew up in Port, tales from the Bend emerge. It seems that the Bend offered the best kind of adventures a boy could have. (Girls seldom went down there). Boys roamed about in a way that would not be permitted in our safety preoccupied times. Many of these stories start…

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My Time at Engine Works

The Commonwealth Government Marine Engine Works was a recognisable landmark on Port Melbourne foreshore since it was built during World War II until the development of the Beacon Cove residential area.. In My Time at Engine Works, Glen Stuart details the making of marine engines during his 29-year career at the works. My Time at Engine Works is available for purchase…

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‘A sodden expanse’ – Fishermans Bend

Rootes Factory in Salmon St. Harold Paynting Collection, State Library of Victoria In the late 1930s Fishermans Bend was on the cusp of a major transformation to industrial development - a change that was anticipated with excitement and optimism. Charles Daley in The History of South Melbourne says: "The once-despised Fishermen's Bend - a no-man's land - under the pressure of economic…

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Three icons of Port

Sometimes you just can't find the right word. Take icon, for example. Many Port Melbourne people have had enough of the word 'icon'. 'Iconic' as new developments are often described, is almost guaranteed to get people's backs up. Port Melbourne foreshore from Princes Pier Three Port landmarks of Port are captured in this image: the beacon, the newly restored Stothert & Pitt…

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Fishermans Bend – the past and the future

Victoria-Australia Port Phillip Henry L. Cox, State Library of Victoria PMHPS's head is spinning with thinking about its submission to the Fishermans Bend Urban Renewal Area Draft Vision, so this week's post is about .... Fishermans Bend! PMHPS will argue that an understanding of the environmental/natural history of Fishermans Bend is fundamental to planning for its future. So lets look at this…

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PMHPS acknowledges the generous support of the City of Port Phillip.

 

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Acknowledgement of Traditional Custodians

We respectfully acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we meet and work, the Bunurong Boon Wurrung and Wurundjeri Woi Wurrung peoples of the Eastern Kulin Nation and pay respect to their Elders past, present and emerging.