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Town Hall, 333 Bay Street, Port Melbourne
Town Hall, 333 Bay Street, Port Melbourne

Pye Street

Pye Street (highlighted). Robinson's Street Directory of Melbourne and Suburbs, Ed 3, c. mid 1940s. Pye Street is a short street running from Williamstown Road to Dunstan Parade in Garden City. It is named for former Victorian State politician, Henry Pye. Henry Pye was born on Christmas Day, 1873 to a farming family at Burnewang near Rochester, Victoria. At a young…

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Memorial to George Sangster

by Margaret Bride Sangster Memorial. Photo: Janet Bolitho. Sangster Reserve occupies the small triangular piece of land behind the Port Melbourne Bowling Club between Princes and Nott Streets. The area includes a children's playground and nearby there is an art deco style electrical substation. Just inside the Nott Street entrance is this monument commemorating the life of George Sangster, once a…

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Prohasky Street

William Henry Prohasky served on the Port Melbourne Council from August 1885 to September 1893. He was Mayor from 1888 to 1889. His fellow councillors were Poolman, Plummer, Edwards, Salmon, Turnbull, and Tarver. He lived at that time at 73 Evans St on the corner of Farrell St in Gloster House, one of three adjacent houses built by…

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Smith Street and Smith Reserve

Two streets, one in Port and one in South Melbourne, as well as a section of Port Melbourne's Railway Reserves, are named after Thomas Smith. This rare distinction reflects Smith's 'lengthy and irreproachable'1 service as Councillor and Mayor, first in South Melbourne and later in Port Melbourne. He also represented Emerald Hill in the Legislative Assembly. Smith Reserve, Rose Postcards, State Library…

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Working at Tom Piper

Win May (nee Smith) and Janet Bolitho worked together on this interview during lockdown in August 2021. Where did you grow up? My parents moved into our house in Griffin Crescent when it was brand new. My mother, Mary, worked at Swallows before marrying. My father, Alex, was a waterside worker who worked in gang 48 as a winch driver.  He would walk…

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Alfred Harman & Sons: Engineers of Derham Street

by David Radcliffe Twenty-one year old Alfred Harman is reported to have started his engineering business in 1885.1 He proudly advertised his services as an “engineer, blacksmith and brass-founder” offering “engines and machinery of every description made to order and repaired at lowest possible rates”.2 His firm, the Port Melbourne Engineering Works, which later became Alfred T Harman & Sons…

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