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Town Hall, 333 Bay Street, Port Melbourne
Town Hall, 333 Bay Street, Port Melbourne

McKay, Reginald Jack (2423)

Place of Birth: Rosebery, VIC

Age: 18 years 3 months

Enlistment Details: Thursday, 15 July 1915 – Melbourne, VIC

Service Number: 2423           view online service record

Address:
36 Clark Street
Port Melbourne, VIC

Next of Kin:
Thomas Fraser McKay (father)
36 Clark Street
Port Melbourne, VIC

Embarkation Details:
Date: Wednesday, 29 September 1915
Ship: RMS Osterley
Port: Melbourne, VIC
Unit: 23rd Infantry Battalion – 5th Reinforcements

Fate:
RTA: Monday, 31 March 1919
Discharged: Friday, 24 October 1919


Brother: Tom Douglas McKay (298)

Teacher at Nott Street School

1915 ‘Presentations to Soldiers.’, Port Melbourne Standard (Vic. : 1914 – 1920), 2 October, p. 2, viewed 26 September, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91164942

1 Comments

  • Brian Membrey
    Posted July 21, 2016 1.06 pm 0Likes

    “Corporal REGINALD J. McKAY, son of Mr. T. F. McKay, of 36 Clarke-street, Port Melbourne, enlisted on the 15th of July, 1915, and embarked with the 5th Reinforcements to the 23rd Battalion on the transport Osterley on the 29th of September He joined his unit at Tel-el-Kebir on the 11th of January,1916, and served at the Canal Zone. On the 12th of March, at Moascar, he was transferred to the 2nd Pioneer Battalion. He went to France with this unit on the 19th of the same month. On the 9th of October, he was transferred to the Anzac Wireless Section, and, on the 23rd of June, 1917, was transferred to the 1st Divisional Signalling Company. He was promoted Corporal on the 19th of September, 1918. On the 20th of December, he was evacuated to hospital, sick, and invalided to England He had taken part in many engagements in the capacity of runner and “power-buzzer “operator. He was at Pozieres, Bullecourt, Passchendaele, and the last big advance that continued until the Americans relieved the 1st Division on the night of the 24th of September, 1918. ” Owing to heavy shelling on that night,” says Corporal McKay, “I slept in the deepest dugout I could find till next morning ; then hurried back in the early morning mist to safety, and the termination of my service in the danger zone.” He returned to Australia on the transport Kyber in May, 1919. Prior to enlisting, he was teaching at School No. 1427, Port Melbourne” (Education Department Record of War Service)

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